archiemcphee:

"What did I do?"
You killed the car.

Swedish Lego Users Group Swebrick just held their annual “AFOL vs AFOL” building contest. AFOL stands for “Adult Fan of LEGO” and this year’s building theme was “Any scene from an ’80s movie or TV show featuring a vehicle.” Builder Etzel87 won first place with this awesome recreation of the unforgettable scene in Ferris Bueller’s Day Off when Cameron vents his long pent-up anger at his dad by kicking his father’s precious Ferrari until it ultimately pops off its jack and crashes through the window of his (now famous) house.

We love the expressions on the minifigs’ faces as they helplessly watch the car plunge toward its doom as well as the use of flat, clear 1x1 pieces for flying shards of glass.

Click here to view the rest of this year’s contest entries.

[via The Brothers Brick]

In 2002, having spent more than three years in one residence for the first time in my life, I got called for jury duty. I show up on time, ready to serve. When we get to the voir dire, the lawyer says to me, “I see you’re an astrophysicist. What’s that?” I answer, “Astrophysics is the laws of physics, applied to the universe—the Big Bang, black holes, that sort of thing.” Then he asks, “What do you teach at Princeton?” and I say, “I teach a class on the evaluation of evidence and the relative unreliability of eyewitness testimony.” Five minutes later, I’m on the street.

A few years later, jury duty again. The judge states that the defendant is charged with possession of 1,700 milligrams of cocaine. It was found on his body, he was arrested, and he is now on trial. This time, after the Q&A is over, the judge asks us whether there are any questions we’d like to ask the court, and I say, “Yes, Your Honor. Why did you say he was in possession of 1,700 milligrams of cocaine? That equals 1.7 grams. The ‘thousand’ cancels with the ‘milli-’ and you get 1.7 grams, which is less than the weight of a dime.” Again I’m out on the street.

Anytime you’re gonna grow, you’re gonna lose something. You’re losing what you’re hanging onto to keep safe. You’re losing habits that you’re comfortable with, you’re losing familiarity.

James Hillman   (via llawra)

(Source: onlinecounsellingcollege)